Kroje a tak

Kokava nad Rimavicou village, Novohrad region, Central Slovakia.

(Source: malohont.sk)

sonofahooker asked: Ahoj :). Vidím že máš pěkny vztah k folkloru, stejne jako ja :D ..Tak mozna ze se za dva tydny uvidime na Myjave ;) budu vystupovat s Kyjovem :D. Dyztak se ozvi

Juj, na Myjavu je to priďaleko, benzín je drahý ;A; Zvyknem ale pozerať naživo v televízií alebo na internete, tak ťa možno uvidím :3

pocarovna:

Folk costume from Eastern Slovakia worn by the singer of folklore ensemble Železiar.

pocarovna:

Folk costume from Eastern Slovakia worn by the singer of folklore ensemble Železiar.

(Source: zeleziar.sk)

Anonymous asked: how would you distinguish between polish and other slavic folk costumes? just wondering bc i can't find too many sources on it

Whoah friend, I’m not very good when it comes to Polish folk costumes! This is Slovak blog D: However I’ll try my best to answer your question from that little I know, there’s high chance I might be wrong with something though! All pictures are from this website.

1. Blouses usually have sleeves long or a little past elbow. The only exception I know are Goral areas on the borders with the Czech Republic and Slovakia and Lemko areas on borders with Slovakia and Ukraine.

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2. Look for red beads!! Poles have thing for red beads. So do some other Slavs though, so be careful.

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3. Also if you see wide strips on apron, pants and/or that thing men wrap around their waist, it’s 99,9% Polish.

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4. As for guys, if you see those long vests that reach almost to knees it’s probably Polish.

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5. Poles are the only non-East Slavs that wear straw hats.

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6. Also be careful when it comes to border areas! They often have same/very similar style in both Poland and bordering country, so you may for example describe Czech costume as Polish.

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Area of town Detva, Podpoľanie region, Central Slovakia.

Area of town Detva, Podpoľanie region, Central Slovakia.

(Source: webumenia.sk)

Anonymous asked: I noticed in the Navigation tag "my drawing" and now I have to ask - do you know anime called Hetalia?

Yes!! I’m interested in things that don’t really match together, haha :D Like collecting pictures of Slovak folk clothing, comparing anime adaptation to original manga or realizing that I was just staring on my own fingers for twenty minutes in a row. If you’d like to, I have personal blog dokudoki and we can talk about Hetalia or anything there c :

I think I might have OCD tendencies because that last post is seriously pissing me off

Závod village, Záhorie region, Western Slovakia.

(Source: fs-zavodzan.sk)

Area of town Zvolen, Podpoľanie region, Central Slovakia.

Area of town Zvolen, Podpoľanie region, Central Slovakia.

(Source: galerialm.sk)

I found my url mentioned on one Japanese blog

Haha I can’t, I’m so happy when people mention me, especially outside Tumblr~

(Source: notarinotariyoga.blog.fc2.com)

Area of town Myjava, Záhorie region, Western Slovakia.

Area of town Myjava, Záhorie region, Western Slovakia.

(Source: ebay.com)

Podpoľanie region, Central Slovakia.

Podpoľanie region, Central Slovakia.

(Source: pixiv.net)

pat-official asked: Ahoj, mohu se zeptat zda bydlíte v Trnavě?

Nie, som zo Zvolena :)

queenofthieves asked: I see so many pictures of male kroje where it's half a shirt & their belly is sticking out. It looks just so horrible. Who thinks this looks good & can you tell me something about these? thx:)

knowslovakia:

It’s not that bad : c

Ah yes, those are shirts from the area of town Detva and other villages of Podpoľanie. There are actually several tales why are those shirts the way they are, the most popular says that one day nobles from the Vígľaš Castle called for one of their parties some dancers from Detva. Those dancers had unusually large bellies and when nobles checked them, they found stolen food hidden under their shirts. So they ordered them and everyone from Detva to make their shirts shorter so they can’t hide stolen things there.

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As for reality, shirt is made from single piece of cloth folded in half with hole made for head, so lenght of shirt is equal to width of sleeve. It’s very easy to make and it saves material. This method is very archaic and endemic exclusively for the aforementioned area, it’s unknown why it’s maintained only in Detva and surroundings or if it was used in other areas of Slovakia or world in past as well.

I should also mention that people wearing these shirts are sometimes called holopupkáči or holopupkári, which literally means “those with nude belly buttons”.

Picture: dlu.sk